Monday, 15 October 2018 00:00

Many people mistake a stubbed toe with a broken toe. This may be a common error because they both produce considerable pain and discomfort. If a toe is broken, it’s important to obtain proper treatment as quickly as possible. If the toe is left untreated, it may affect walking and running ability in addition to experiencing chronic pain. There is known to be a few differences between a broken toe and a sprained toe. These may include bruising, pain in the exact area of the break, or a possible dislocation, which may accompany a fractured toe. A sprained toe may have more generalized pain in the surrounding area where the injury has occurred, although there may be considerable bruising. If you feel you have broken or sprained your toe, it may be beneficial to seek the counsel of a podiatrist to obtain a correct diagnosis and offer the best course of treatment.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Scott Shrem from Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 08 October 2018 00:00

Many people are afflicted with several types of foot conditions, and these may be indicative of additional health issues that may be present in the body. Some people may experience muscle spasms and this may be a result of dehydration. If these spasms should occur while walking or running, it could be a symptom of a circulatory ailment. Additionally, a condition that is referred to as gout may be a result of excess uric acid that is present in the blood. Gout is a form of arthritis, which affects the big toe and typically produces extreme pain and discomfort. Patients who experience cold feet for the majority of the time may be aware that it may be a symptom of diabetes, thyroid concerns, or anemia. If you are experiencing any foot conditions, please consult with a podiatrist to learn how this may be a sign of other health issues.

When dealing with systemic disease of the feet, it is extremely important to check the affected areas routinely so that any additional problems are caught quickly.  If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles contact Dr. Scott Shrem from Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will assist you with all of your podiatric needs.

Systemic Diseases of the Feet

Systemic diseases affect the whole body, and symptoms usually are displayed in the feet. This condition can make a patient’s ability to walk unbearable.  Systemic diseases include gout, diabetes mellitus, neurological disorders, and arthritis.

Gout – is caused by an excess of uric acid in the body. Common symptoms include pain, inflammation, and redness at the metatarsal/phalangeal joint of the base big toe. Gout can be treated by NSAIDs to relieve pain and inflammation, and other drugs that lower the acid levels in the body.

Diabetes mellitus – is an increase in the level of blood sugar that the body cannot counteract with its own insulin. Failure to produce enough insulin is a factor in Diabetes.

Diabetes of the Feet

Diabetic Neuropathy – may lead to damaged nerves and affect the feet through numbness and loss of sensation.

Peripheral Vascular Disease – can restrict the blood flow to the feet, and often times lead to amputation of the feet. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 01 October 2018 00:00

If you are a diabetic patient, you are most likely aware of the importance of taking proper care of your feet. Cuts and scrapes have a tendency to not heal promptly as a result of a compromised immune system. An uncomfortable and painful condition known as a foot ulcer may occur, and this may possibly lead to a serious infection. If this type of wound is not treated quickly, the possibility of developing gangrene may increase, which may lead to amputation. There may be several reasons why wounds can develop, and these may include cracked and dry skin, ingrown toenails, which may cut the skin of the toe, or blisters. Additionally, there may be noticeable symptoms including extreme tenderness, redness, discomfort and pain. If you have wounds on your feet, the importance of speaking with a podiatrist promptly is crucial for the discussion and implementation of correct treatment options.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Scott Shrem from Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a nondiabetic. 

What is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 24 September 2018 00:00

Severe pain and discomfort that is felt on the ball of the foot may be indicative of a condition that is referred to as Morton’s neuroma. It is often the result of nerves that become inflamed between the third and fourth toes, and is often known as a intermetatarsal neuroma. A major symptom of this condition is pain that is experienced on the bottom of the foot, possibly causing difficulty in walking.  Many people may generally feel a tingling sensation in addition to feeling a burning sensitivity in the ball of the foot. A common reason for this condition to occur may be choosing to wear shoes that do not fit properly, and this may possibly cause the nerves in the foot to become irritated and inflamed. Additionally, performing certain activities may play a significant role in the formation of Morton’s neuroma. It’s advised to counsel with a podiatrist for proper treatments if you are afflicted with this ailment

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Scott Shrem of Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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