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Monday, 30 November 2020 00:00

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder that causes the immune system to attack healthy tissue in the joints. Often, the joints of the feet and ankles are affected. Early symptoms of RA include joint pain during movement and at rest, swelling, tenderness, or warmth in the joints, joint stiffness, low energy or fatigue, a low-grade fever, and a loss of appetite. RA affects 1.5 million people in the United States, and there are several risk factors that can make someone more likely to develop RA. These risk factors include being 60 years of age or older, being female, and being obese. If you develop symptoms of RA in the joints of your feet and ankles, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist to help you manage this condition. 

Because RA affects more than just your joints, including the joints in your feet and ankles, it is important to seek early diagnosis from your podiatrist if you feel like the pain in your feet might be caused by RA. For more information, contact Dr. Scott Shrem of Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will assist you with all of your podiatric concerns.

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks the membranes surrounding the joints. Inflammation of the lining and eventually the destruction of the joint’s cartilage and bone occur, causing severe pain and immobility.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Feet

Although RA usually attacks multiple bones and joints throughout the entire body, almost 90 percent of cases result in pain in the foot or ankle area.

Symptoms

  • Swelling and pain in the feet
  • Stiffness in the feet
  • Pain on the ball or sole of feet
  • Joint shift and deformation

Diagnosis

Quick diagnosis of RA in the feet is important so that the podiatrist can treat the area effectively. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history, occupation, and lifestyle to determine the origin of the condition. Rheumatoid Factor tests help to determine if someone is affected by the disease.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Feet
Saturday, 28 November 2020 00:00

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Monday, 23 November 2020 00:00

A small area of hardened skin that develops on the bottom of the feet or between the toes may be indicative of a corn. A corn can cause severe pain and discomfort, and it generally forms as a result of excessive friction. This friction is typically caused by wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, which can also affect your gait. The corn may diminish in size when wearing properly fitted shoes, or when the activity that caused the friction is temporarily ceased. Some patients find mild relief when a protective pad is worn over the corn. If the corn is severe, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can offer effective treatment solutions, such as trimming the corn. 

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Scott Shrem of Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Understanding Corns and Calluses
Monday, 16 November 2020 00:00

The nerve tissue that is found between the third and fourth toes is generally affected by the condition that is known as Morton’s neuroma. When this nerve thickens as a result of irritation, daily activities may be difficult to complete. The pain that is associated with this ailment is often felt in the ball of the foot, and may cause discomfort when walking. Common reasons why Morton’s neuroma may develop can include wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in, or from enduring a foot injury. Additionally, it may gradually develop from a medical condition such as flat feet. Mild relief may be found when specific foot stretches and exercises are performed, and shoes that fit properly are worn. If you have pain between your toes or on the bottom of your foot, it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat Morton’s neuroma.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Scott Shrem of Garden State Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hazlet, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
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